Hiroshima Day, 1957
Hiroshima Day, 1957

Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City. WRL and other groups picketing at the Soviet Union and U.S. missions to the United Nations.

 Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City.

Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City.

 Ammon Hennacy (center), Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City.

Ammon Hennacy (center), Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City.

 Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City.

Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City.

Against Bomb Tests, 1958
Against Bomb Tests, 1958

WRL participated with SANE to protest nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.

 Protesting nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.

Protesting nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.

 Protesting nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.

Protesting nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.

 WRL participated with SANE to protest nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958. WRL staff member Ralph DiGia.

WRL participated with SANE to protest nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958. WRL staff member Ralph DiGia.

 Protesting nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.

Protesting nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.

 The first of several annual protests against nuclear weapons was organized by WRL in conjunction with the Aldermaston march in England.

The first of several annual protests against nuclear weapons was organized by WRL in conjunction with the Aldermaston march in England.

 The U.S. walk was was one of many in the U.S. Marchers from New England merged in New York, passing through Columbus Circle and by the old New York Coliseum on the way to the U.N.

The U.S. walk was was one of many in the U.S. Marchers from New England merged in New York, passing through Columbus Circle and by the old New York Coliseum on the way to the U.N.

 DAVID DELLINGER speaks at a rally during the Walk for Peace. New York City, April 4, 1958.

DAVID DELLINGER speaks at a rally during the Walk for Peace. New York City, April 4, 1958.

 A.J. MUSTE, Walk for Peace, New York City, April 4, 1958.

A.J. MUSTE, Walk for Peace, New York City, April 4, 1958.

 The  EASTER WALK FOR PEACE —  with feeder marches from New Haven and Philadelphia — converges on the U.N. April 4, 1958.

The EASTER WALK FOR PEACE — with feeder marches from New Haven and Philadelphia — converges on the U.N. April 4, 1958.

Student Peace Day, May 1958
Student Peace Day, May 1958

Student Peace Day, May 1958, United Nations, NYC.

 Student Peace Day, May 1958, United Nations, NYC. WRL cosponsored Student Peace Day and Walk for Peace actions with Catholic Worker and other groups.

Student Peace Day, May 1958, United Nations, NYC. WRL cosponsored Student Peace Day and Walk for Peace actions with Catholic Worker and other groups.

 Student Peace Day, May 1958, United Nations, NYC.

Student Peace Day, May 1958, United Nations, NYC.

Easter Walk for Peace, 1959
Easter Walk for Peace, 1959

Easter Walk for Peace arriving in Times Square from the outer edge of the radius of potential damage from an atomic bomb dropped on NYC, Mar. 28, 1959.

  Norman Thomas  speaking at the Times Square rally. NYC, March 28, 1959.

Norman Thomas speaking at the Times Square rally. NYC, March 28, 1959.

Easter Walk for Peace, March 1959
Easter Walk for Peace, March 1959

Marchers pose at the Isaiah Wall near the UN, March 28, 1959. Wally Nelson (center under “W” in “War”), Jim Peck (under “R”), Ralph DiGia (4th from right).

Rally in Support of Dorothy Day, 1959
Rally in Support of Dorothy Day, 1959

Rally in Support of Dorothy Day and 4 others still in jail for refusing to participate in the April 17, 1959, civil defense drill, City Hall Park, NYC.

  RALLY IN SUPPORT OF DOROTHY DAY  and 4 others still in jail for refusing to participate in the April 17, 1959, civil defense drill, City Hall Park, NYC.

RALLY IN SUPPORT OF DOROTHY DAY and 4 others still in jail for refusing to participate in the April 17, 1959, civil defense drill, City Hall Park, NYC.

Hiroshima Day, 1959
Hiroshima Day, 1959

Hiroshima Day vigil in Times Square, August 6, 1959.

Walk for Peace 1961
Walk for Peace 1961

The 1961 Walk for Peace coincided with a walk from London to Holy Loch, Scotland, to protest the British government allowing a U.S. Naval base with submarines carrying the Polaris, a new nuclear missile.

 Walkers converged from New England and points west and south of New York City and ended at the U.N.

Walkers converged from New England and points west and south of New York City and ended at the U.N.

 The 1961 peace walk was one of the first to feature the "ND symbol" or peace symbol, which was designed for the Aldermaston anti-nuclear walks in England. The symbol used semaphore code letters for ND for Nuclear Disarmament surrounded by a circle signifying total or complete nuclear disarmament.

The 1961 peace walk was one of the first to feature the "ND symbol" or peace symbol, which was designed for the Aldermaston anti-nuclear walks in England. The symbol used semaphore code letters for ND for Nuclear Disarmament surrounded by a circle signifying total or complete nuclear disarmament.

First Demonstration Against Vietnam War
First Demonstration Against Vietnam War

War Resisters League sponsored the first demonstration against the Vietnam War in the U.S. on Sept. 21, 1963, in front of the U.S. Mission to the U.N. Rev. Donald S. Harrington of the Community Church of New York spoke.

Special Session on Disarmament I, 1978
Special Session on Disarmament I, 1978

Posters for the Special Session on Disarmament Sit-In, June 1978.

 The new coalition Mobilization for Survival sponsored the march and rally at SSD I, on May 27, 1978. Molly Wilson (left) and Virginia Eggleston were active with the Greenwich Village Peace Coalition, and Virginia was a longtime WRL volunteer. 

The new coalition Mobilization for Survival sponsored the march and rally at SSD I, on May 27, 1978. Molly Wilson (left) and Virginia Eggleston were active with the Greenwich Village Peace Coalition, and Virginia was a longtime WRL volunteer. 

 Ralph DiGia and Bill Sutherland at the march and rally at SSD I, on May 27, 1978.

Ralph DiGia and Bill Sutherland at the march and rally at SSD I, on May 27, 1978.

White House Lawn 11 Sentencing, February 12, 1979
White House Lawn 11 Sentencing, February 12, 1979

WRL members unfurled a banner in court at the end of the trial and sentencing for the 11 arrested on the White House Lawn, Sept. 4, 1978. Grace Paley is in profile center-ish, Jim Peck (left on banner) and John Green (right).

 The trial and sentencing of the White House 11 ended with all convicted and given $100 fines and probation. The seven who had unfurled a banner in Red Square in Moscow at a simultaneous action Sept. 4, 1978, were sent home without arrest or charges.

The trial and sentencing of the White House 11 ended with all convicted and given $100 fines and probation. The seven who had unfurled a banner in Red Square in Moscow at a simultaneous action Sept. 4, 1978, were sent home without arrest or charges.

 After the trial, defendants and supporters marched to Lafayette Park and on to the White House to deliver their message again. 

After the trial, defendants and supporters marched to Lafayette Park and on to the White House to deliver their message again. 

white-house-lawn-march-woman-sign.jpg
 Norma Becker, WRL Chair, in front with Buddhist monks. Norma was one of seven who held a "No Nuclear Weapons! No Nuclear Power! USA or USSR" banner in Red Square.

Norma Becker, WRL Chair, in front with Buddhist monks. Norma was one of seven who held a "No Nuclear Weapons! No Nuclear Power! USA or USSR" banner in Red Square.

Special Session on Disarmament II, 1982
Special Session on Disarmament II, 1982

Igal Roodenko (left), WRL staff, and Roy Finch, former WRL chair, among the million in Central Park demanding nuclear disarmament, June 12, 1982.

 Allan-Ginsberg-SSD-II-June-1982.

Allan-Ginsberg-SSD-II-June-1982.

Special Session on Disarmament III, 1988
Special Session on Disarmament III, 1988

Thousands marched again in New York City in June 1988 at the third Special Session on Disarmament at the U.N. There were many Japanese contingents.

 Survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the U.S. were among the marchers.

Survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the U.S. were among the marchers.

 One of the Japanese contingents.

One of the Japanese contingents.

women-in-garbSSD3b.jpg
 Bread and Puppet Theater from Vermont wowed the crowd with their huge puppets and stunning costumes at the disarmament march during the third Special Session on Disarmament in NYC. 

Bread and Puppet Theater from Vermont wowed the crowd with their huge puppets and stunning costumes at the disarmament march during the third Special Session on Disarmament in NYC. 

 Bread and Puppet Theater honoring the slain El Salvadoran priest at the third Special Session on Disarmament march.

Bread and Puppet Theater honoring the slain El Salvadoran priest at the third Special Session on Disarmament march.

Hiroshima Day, 1957
 Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City.
 Ammon Hennacy (center), Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City.
 Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City.
Against Bomb Tests, 1958
 Protesting nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.
 Protesting nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.
 WRL participated with SANE to protest nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958. WRL staff member Ralph DiGia.
 Protesting nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.
 The first of several annual protests against nuclear weapons was organized by WRL in conjunction with the Aldermaston march in England.
 The U.S. walk was was one of many in the U.S. Marchers from New England merged in New York, passing through Columbus Circle and by the old New York Coliseum on the way to the U.N.
 DAVID DELLINGER speaks at a rally during the Walk for Peace. New York City, April 4, 1958.
 A.J. MUSTE, Walk for Peace, New York City, April 4, 1958.
 The  EASTER WALK FOR PEACE —  with feeder marches from New Haven and Philadelphia — converges on the U.N. April 4, 1958.
Student Peace Day, May 1958
 Student Peace Day, May 1958, United Nations, NYC. WRL cosponsored Student Peace Day and Walk for Peace actions with Catholic Worker and other groups.
 Student Peace Day, May 1958, United Nations, NYC.
Easter Walk for Peace, 1959
  Norman Thomas  speaking at the Times Square rally. NYC, March 28, 1959.
Easter Walk for Peace, March 1959
Rally in Support of Dorothy Day, 1959
  RALLY IN SUPPORT OF DOROTHY DAY  and 4 others still in jail for refusing to participate in the April 17, 1959, civil defense drill, City Hall Park, NYC.
Hiroshima Day, 1959
Walk for Peace 1961
 Walkers converged from New England and points west and south of New York City and ended at the U.N.
 The 1961 peace walk was one of the first to feature the "ND symbol" or peace symbol, which was designed for the Aldermaston anti-nuclear walks in England. The symbol used semaphore code letters for ND for Nuclear Disarmament surrounded by a circle signifying total or complete nuclear disarmament.
First Demonstration Against Vietnam War
Special Session on Disarmament I, 1978
 The new coalition Mobilization for Survival sponsored the march and rally at SSD I, on May 27, 1978. Molly Wilson (left) and Virginia Eggleston were active with the Greenwich Village Peace Coalition, and Virginia was a longtime WRL volunteer. 
 Ralph DiGia and Bill Sutherland at the march and rally at SSD I, on May 27, 1978.
White House Lawn 11 Sentencing, February 12, 1979
 The trial and sentencing of the White House 11 ended with all convicted and given $100 fines and probation. The seven who had unfurled a banner in Red Square in Moscow at a simultaneous action Sept. 4, 1978, were sent home without arrest or charges.
 After the trial, defendants and supporters marched to Lafayette Park and on to the White House to deliver their message again. 
white-house-lawn-march-woman-sign.jpg
 Norma Becker, WRL Chair, in front with Buddhist monks. Norma was one of seven who held a "No Nuclear Weapons! No Nuclear Power! USA or USSR" banner in Red Square.
Special Session on Disarmament II, 1982
 Allan-Ginsberg-SSD-II-June-1982.
Special Session on Disarmament III, 1988
 Survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the U.S. were among the marchers.
 One of the Japanese contingents.
women-in-garbSSD3b.jpg
 Bread and Puppet Theater from Vermont wowed the crowd with their huge puppets and stunning costumes at the disarmament march during the third Special Session on Disarmament in NYC. 
 Bread and Puppet Theater honoring the slain El Salvadoran priest at the third Special Session on Disarmament march.
Hiroshima Day, 1957

Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City. WRL and other groups picketing at the Soviet Union and U.S. missions to the United Nations.

Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City.

Ammon Hennacy (center), Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City.

Hiroshima Day protest, August 6, 1957, New York City.

Against Bomb Tests, 1958

WRL participated with SANE to protest nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.

Protesting nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.

Protesting nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.

WRL participated with SANE to protest nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958. WRL staff member Ralph DiGia.

Protesting nuclear bomb tests April 13, 1958.

The first of several annual protests against nuclear weapons was organized by WRL in conjunction with the Aldermaston march in England.

The U.S. walk was was one of many in the U.S. Marchers from New England merged in New York, passing through Columbus Circle and by the old New York Coliseum on the way to the U.N.

DAVID DELLINGER speaks at a rally during the Walk for Peace. New York City, April 4, 1958.

A.J. MUSTE, Walk for Peace, New York City, April 4, 1958.

The EASTER WALK FOR PEACE — with feeder marches from New Haven and Philadelphia — converges on the U.N. April 4, 1958.

Student Peace Day, May 1958

Student Peace Day, May 1958, United Nations, NYC.

Student Peace Day, May 1958, United Nations, NYC. WRL cosponsored Student Peace Day and Walk for Peace actions with Catholic Worker and other groups.

Student Peace Day, May 1958, United Nations, NYC.

Easter Walk for Peace, 1959

Easter Walk for Peace arriving in Times Square from the outer edge of the radius of potential damage from an atomic bomb dropped on NYC, Mar. 28, 1959.

Norman Thomas speaking at the Times Square rally. NYC, March 28, 1959.

Easter Walk for Peace, March 1959

Marchers pose at the Isaiah Wall near the UN, March 28, 1959. Wally Nelson (center under “W” in “War”), Jim Peck (under “R”), Ralph DiGia (4th from right).

Rally in Support of Dorothy Day, 1959

Rally in Support of Dorothy Day and 4 others still in jail for refusing to participate in the April 17, 1959, civil defense drill, City Hall Park, NYC.

RALLY IN SUPPORT OF DOROTHY DAY and 4 others still in jail for refusing to participate in the April 17, 1959, civil defense drill, City Hall Park, NYC.

Hiroshima Day, 1959

Hiroshima Day vigil in Times Square, August 6, 1959.

Walk for Peace 1961

The 1961 Walk for Peace coincided with a walk from London to Holy Loch, Scotland, to protest the British government allowing a U.S. Naval base with submarines carrying the Polaris, a new nuclear missile.

Walkers converged from New England and points west and south of New York City and ended at the U.N.

The 1961 peace walk was one of the first to feature the "ND symbol" or peace symbol, which was designed for the Aldermaston anti-nuclear walks in England. The symbol used semaphore code letters for ND for Nuclear Disarmament surrounded by a circle signifying total or complete nuclear disarmament.

First Demonstration Against Vietnam War

War Resisters League sponsored the first demonstration against the Vietnam War in the U.S. on Sept. 21, 1963, in front of the U.S. Mission to the U.N. Rev. Donald S. Harrington of the Community Church of New York spoke.

Special Session on Disarmament I, 1978

Posters for the Special Session on Disarmament Sit-In, June 1978.

The new coalition Mobilization for Survival sponsored the march and rally at SSD I, on May 27, 1978. Molly Wilson (left) and Virginia Eggleston were active with the Greenwich Village Peace Coalition, and Virginia was a longtime WRL volunteer. 

Ralph DiGia and Bill Sutherland at the march and rally at SSD I, on May 27, 1978.

White House Lawn 11 Sentencing, February 12, 1979

WRL members unfurled a banner in court at the end of the trial and sentencing for the 11 arrested on the White House Lawn, Sept. 4, 1978. Grace Paley is in profile center-ish, Jim Peck (left on banner) and John Green (right).

The trial and sentencing of the White House 11 ended with all convicted and given $100 fines and probation. The seven who had unfurled a banner in Red Square in Moscow at a simultaneous action Sept. 4, 1978, were sent home without arrest or charges.

After the trial, defendants and supporters marched to Lafayette Park and on to the White House to deliver their message again. 

Norma Becker, WRL Chair, in front with Buddhist monks. Norma was one of seven who held a "No Nuclear Weapons! No Nuclear Power! USA or USSR" banner in Red Square.

Special Session on Disarmament II, 1982

Igal Roodenko (left), WRL staff, and Roy Finch, former WRL chair, among the million in Central Park demanding nuclear disarmament, June 12, 1982.

Allan-Ginsberg-SSD-II-June-1982.

Special Session on Disarmament III, 1988

Thousands marched again in New York City in June 1988 at the third Special Session on Disarmament at the U.N. There were many Japanese contingents.

Survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the U.S. were among the marchers.

One of the Japanese contingents.

Bread and Puppet Theater from Vermont wowed the crowd with their huge puppets and stunning costumes at the disarmament march during the third Special Session on Disarmament in NYC. 

Bread and Puppet Theater honoring the slain El Salvadoran priest at the third Special Session on Disarmament march.

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